Food Boggle – a fun way to learn key definitions.

I was suprised last week when one of my exam classes asked me if we could spend 10 minutes of each lesson doing some revision work in preparation for their GCSE exam. They asked this question the day after we had a revision lesson based on a number of games saying that they had  such fun and learnt so much that they would like to do it every lesson. I was shocked to be honest but even more surprised when I requestioned them on what we had learnt in the ‘fun’ lesson and they had remembered basically everything.

So I have planned a fun 10 minute revision activity for tomorrow’s lesson. I have decided to focus on the topic of aeration. I will show them these letters from the game boggle and they have to come up with three words based on aeration.

I will use the timer which is for 3 minutes to time the activity.

The three hidden words are

Aerate

Foam

Yeast

I will then read through and explain the definition of each word for 5 minutes using flash cards

Aerate: means to add air to mixtures.When sugar is beaten with a fat or with an egg it adds air to a mixture. This helps cakes to rise and it also gives them a light texture.

Foam – a foam is a type of substance that is formed when many gas bubbles are trapped in a liquid or solid.Whisked egg whites are an example of a foam as they are a mixture of a liquid ( egg white) and gas (air).

Yeast is a type of fungus.Yeast is used in bread making to help bread rise. Yeast needs the right conditions to grow – food, moisture, warmth and time.It ferments and produces carbon dioxide which pushes up the bread dough.

Then I will give pupils 3 minutes on timer to remember as much of each definition as possible. I will check learning at the end of lesson.

Hopefully it will be a fun and effective way of revising key words associated with aeration.

 

 

 

 

 

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