Food Investigation Task – Maillard Reaction

Proudlove in his book the Science and Technology of Food (pg 45) describes the Maillard Reaction as follows:

“ a brown colouration which is produced when a solution of glucose is heated with amino acid glycine. This reaction between the amnion group (NH2) of a protein or amino acid and the aldehyde group of a reducing sugar is called the Maillard reaction.”

In simpler terms, the Maillard Reaction is defined by Jenny Ridgwell in “ Food Science You Can Eat” (pg 10) as

“ a chemical reaction between amino acids found in proteins and sugars in foods”.

Either way, pupils who study the new Food Preparation and Nutrition curriculum need to know about it. After reading “ The Science Of Cooking” by Peter Barham (in particular page 88) I have been inspired to do the following experiment as a  Food Investigation Task  with my food pupils.

Perhaps, you would like to give it a go too!!!!

 

Food Investigation Task

Aim

To investigate how the browning reactions (Maillard Reaction) when cooking meat is affected by the temperature used.

 

Method

Cut a piece of steak into 8 small equally sized pieces.

Put a baking tray into the oven and allow it to heat up.

Cook each piece of meat at the following temperature and time.

Oven Temperature  Time
100 degrees Celsius 12 minutes
120 degrees Celsius 9.5 minutes
140 degrees Celsius 8 minutes
160 degrees Celsius 7 minutes
180  degrees Celsius 6 minutes
200 degrees Celsius 5.5 minutes
220 degrees Celsius 5 minutes
240  degrees Celsius 4 minutes

 

Controls

Each piece of steak should be the same size.

Each piece of steak should be cooked by the same cooking method (the oven in this case).

An oven thermometer ensures that the temperature is accurate.

 

Prediction/Hypothesis

Meat that is cooked below the temperature of 130 degrees Celsius should have very little flavour.

Meaty flavours should develop at temperatures between 140 and 180 degrees Celsius. The flavour will develop more quickly if you increase the surface are of the meat by cutting it into small pieces.

Results

Oven Temperature  Time Observations
100 degrees Celsius 12 minutes  

 

120 degrees Celsius 9.5 minutes  

 

140 degrees Celsius 8 minutes  

 

160 degrees Celsius 7 minutes  

 

180  degrees Celsius 6 minutes  

 

200 degrees Celsius 5.5 minutes  

 

220 degrees Celsius 5 minutes  

 

240  degrees Celsius 4 minutes  

 

 

Conclusion

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evaluation

Advertisements

Feel free to comment or email me at foodandhealthteacher@hotmail.com if you would like to discuss this blog further.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s